Journal of TFAM No.41

主編語
Editor-in-chief’s Note

Editor's Note

HUANG Chien-Hung

Abstract

The trans-disciplinary practice itself is a transfer, dialogue, and connection between different technologies. In the context of Taiwan’s complex multi-colonial experience and the industrial development governed by the Other, “projection,” “calibration,” “modification,” and “critique” thus became four structural responses to the 1980s environment. In other words, these responses proactively project to internalization, constantly checking the accuracy of external information responding to the necessity of local value in a lively information society. Furthermore, in a state of structural resource scarcity, they modify the instrumentality of external information and internal needs modification of external information and systematically criticize Euro-American knowledge with the connection of local creativity and geopolitics. Undoubtedly, Hsu Chun-Yi re-manifests these structural responses developed since the 1980s in his “Eye of Aerial Machine: The Impersonal Perception of Vertical Horizon,” discussing practices of Harun Farocki, Forensic Architecture with a particular focus on Hito Steyerl’s image of nonhuman’s eyes. Such an image of the nonhuman’s eye might be called the “eye of totality,” which means that advances in technology extend the scope of viewing and make an image become the immanence or body of all things. In other words, “image” becomes a comprehensive “paracolonial” zone.

 

Now, we return to Taiwan, the further south of Germany (to the South of Greece). The “south” in Chinese mentality and narrative have always been standing for the migration regime, primarily referring to the south of the Yangtze River, while in the 1980s Taiwan, the “south” was transformed into a symbolic location of resistance to authoritarianism, referring to an area away from the Chinse and Taipei regime. In the 1990s, it became the political and economic target-- New Southbound (Southeast Asia) as the policy against the “Cautious Self-Restraint” strategy for “going west” (pro-China). Until the 21st century, Goldman Sachs named the “Next Eleven” list of countries in its annual report in 2005, including the Philippines, Indonesia, and Vietnam. Therefore, we may conclude that the concept of “south” in Taiwan does not always refer to a specific geographical location, but political and economic opportunities and options, which have directed the industrial development and technological investment, and even changed the direction of education, art, and culture. In other words, political economy has always been an important factor of “trans-disciplinary” practices and the landscape of various “trans-disciplinary” avantgarde experiments or concrete actions. In “Making South: The ‘South’ as a Method in Taiwan Contemporary Curating,” Lu Pei-Yi investigates and analyzes three recent exhibitions in Taiwan under the theme of “the South,” making the advancement and development of the concept of the “South” in contemporary art a genealogical site of reflection.

 

On the one hand, technology becomes a “way of doing” that can be universally learned, replicated, and appropriated, and on the other hand, it has gradually developed into a “way of living.” When the extensive mechanization (exosomatisation) and the reflexive bio-politics (para-colonialism) converge in contemporary times, “trans-disciplinary” practices become a “technique” of capital accumulation for the privileged; however, it also serves as the “technique” of dismissing capital for those who resist the power to disguise, penetrate, and struggle. However, when capital, like power, has become the content of “relationship,” it becomes the deep-rooted connotations of life technique, making it necessary for those who resist to “play,” or rather, the way out of life itself is to “play a certain role.” Chang Wen-Hsuan then attempts to contextualize such a relational life technique in “When A Speech Acquires Its Body: Lecture Performance as An Event.” She cleverly sets up a conversational relationship between the dominant Euro-American discourse and the local language of Chen Chieh-Jen, breaking away from Taiwan’s long-standing dichotomic dynamics (the dynamics founded on the East-West confrontation and the unification/independence issue as the driving force of internal friction). Then, she returns to the essential significances of performance, role-playing, performing in “action,” “history,” and “politics.”

 

“Rethinking trans-disciplinary practices” must leave the formalistic manipulation of transnational cultural marketing and recognize “trans-discipline” itself has always been a “technical” issue engaging historical and political conditions and meanings. Finally, this issue attempts to present that “trans-discipline,” or the “technique of trans-disciplinary practices,” is a fundamental state of both biology and ecology. From the mitochondria to the eukaryote, from the indigenous species to the parasite, from the image itself to the poor image and the eye of machine, the “eye of totality,” we can conclude that life is not an object represented through trans-disciplinary practices, it is trans-disciplinary itself.

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Eye of Aerial Machine : The Impersonal Perception of Vertical Horizon

HSU Chun Yi

Student of PhD Program, Department of Fine Arts, Taipei National University of Arts.

Abstract

Modern visual instruments, led by photography, almost kept pace with the development of flight technics, both of which revolutionized human perception of time and space. Images captured by eyes on aircraft, which is a modern microcosm that enables Homo sapiens can think in a nonhuman status. At first these optical technics have developed rapidly in scientific and military fields, such as geographical observation, military photography and aerial reconnaissance. On the other hand, eyes on flying machine completely pass over humans’ perceptional limitation, hence the Soviet director Dziga Vertov's concept ‘kino-eye’, referring to an all-seeing eye of superman. Nowadays, however, with technological development of visual machine and the consequent overuse, the role of humans as operator of machine has shifted to object being observed. This article begins with the "flight" of visual machine to explore its non-human view, in an attempt to analyze its philosophical nature. In this sense, the article delves into the nature of "impersonality" in the said images by studying trans-disciplinary practice of art and technics from different contexts. Finally, it inquires the status of being in today's “vertical horizon”, composed of multiple bird view images from flying machines with the operation of images.

Keywords: flying, technic, image, visual machine, impersonal

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When A Speech Acquires Its Body: Lecture Performance as An Event

CHANG Wen Hsuan

Student of PhD Program, Department of Fine Arts, Taipei National University of Arts.

Abstract

Following the gradual acceptance of "lecture performance," the mixed origin of a lecture performance has also resulted in misjudged and insufficient reading due to a disciplinary-bonded position of recipiency. The emergence of lecture performance has been widely seen as a concurrence of the avant-garde movement, institutional critique, and alternative pedagogy proposal in the 1960 and 1970, which follows with another resurgence around 2000. Through comparative reading of two iconic works of lecture performances, namely Robert Morris’s 21.3(1964) and Xavier Le Roy’s Product of Circumstances(1999), the essay revisits the discursive development of lecture performances in recent years. By positioning “lecture-performance” in a parasitic framework of intersubjectivity, the paper examines the tripartite strsucture of “imagespeech-body” as well as other assemblages: “speech-act” and “essay-film”. The essay aims to propose an alternative genealogy of lecture performance in Taiwan by considering the role of Benshi facilitated through activities of the Taiwanese Cultural Association.

Keywords: Lecture Performance, Benshi, Parasite, Speech Act Theory

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Making South: The “South” as a Method in Taiwan Contemporary Curating

LU Pei-Yi

Associate Professor, MA in Critical and Curatorial Studies of Contemporary Art, National Taipei University of Education

Abstract

This paper critically examines three exhibitions relating to the idea of “South”. In particular, it will analyze a number of case studies, such as South Country, South of Country – Vietnamese & Taiwanese Artists Exchange Project (Howl Space, Tainan, 2012-2013), The South: An Art of Asking and Listening (Kaohsiung Museum of Fine Arts, 2017), The Hidden South (presented in multiple spaces across four towns in the south-link areas, 2018) and so on in order to probe the questions of curating in Taiwan in the context of its multi-layer colonized history, and as a country marked by geopolitical rivalry. What is driving force behind “making south” as a curatorial method? Is it an attempt to explore Taiwan’s identity or an expression of political correctness? How does the ambiguity of the idea of the “South” impact on contemporary curating? Could the practice of “Curating the South” become a strategy to unsettle conventional ways of presenting art from the margins, or does it simply reinforce the existing hierarchies of the globalized art world? This paper argues that the ambiguity of the idea of the “South” has frequently emerged in various exhibitions. In the context of Taiwan, a number of exhibitions have expanded the multi-faceted meaning of the “South,” marking its geo-cultural and geo-political location as well as defining its uneven internal development between the North and South and its modernity and ecological future as part of the Global South and as aligned with Southeast Asia and Austronesia.

Keywords: Making South, Taiwan Contemporary Art, Curatorial Studies, Imaged Geography

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Online ISSN 1560-4713
GPN 2008700071
Update:2021-07-26 11:10